Audio capture and cleanup


Tutorial: Capturing Soundboard Audio for Live Event Video

This tutorial is up on the Streaming Media website. Here's the intro. Connecting your camcorder to an external microphone or soundboard is a critical skill for any event or corporate videographer, though it can be surprisingly challenging, making i...

Normalization and Compression in Adobe CS5.5

Streaming viewers will tolerate some video degradation but expect audio to be near perfect. There are two techniques you can use to make sure that your audio loud, clear and robust. Normalization increases volume as much as possible without introducing distortion into the file, while compression makes the signal as robust as possible. In this tutorial, you'll learn how to apply normalization in Adobe Audition and Adobe Premiere Pro, and how to apply compression in Adobe Audition.

Roundtrip Audio Editing Workflow: Adobe Premiere Pro and Audition CS5.5

One of my favorite features in Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 is the return of Adobe Audition. In this tutorial, I detail the round trip editing workflow between Premiere Pro and Audition.

Click over to the main article to view the tutorial.

Removing Echo from Audio with Adobe Audition

So, there I was, shooting a video for a Peer Review for StreamingMedia.com. If you're not familiar with these videos, it's where I critique videos presented by different web sites. While I simply don't have the production facilities to match the quality of some of the sites that I comment on, I do try to maximize the quality of my audio and video.

I was trying out a new microphone with the video segment, saw that levels were good, but didn't otherway pay attention to the quality. Then I got to editing the video (after putting away the lights, and storing all the audio gear, of course) and noticed a pretty severe echo in the audio. To learn how I fixed the problem, click over to the main article.

 

Audio Production Gone Bad

You can learn how to shoot video in one of two ways. You can apprentice under the direction of an experienced videographer who's done it all and seen it all, and leverage the lessons he or she has learned over the years.

Or, you can book the jobs, buy the gear, do your research, and shoot the shoot. Though the first technique isn't foolproof, the latter is reminiscent of what experienced cyclists will tell you about falling off the bike. It's not a question of if, it's a question of when.

Editing Audio for Video in Adobe Soundbooth--Five Key Tasks

I’m a big Adobe Audition fan, and when I heard that the powerful multitrack audio editing program found in Adobe Production Studio would be replaced in the upcoming CS3 bundle by a more feature-limited version, I was less than pleased. That said, calling Soundbooth, the program that replaced Audition, "video-centric" rather than "feature-limited" is not smooth marketing talk. Soundbooth includes most features that video editors will need and is easier to learn than Audition. It also boasts a new background music creation feature that has promise, if not polish.

In this tutorial, I’ll provide an overview of Soundbooth’s interface and then focus on how to accomplish common tasks like normalization, noise removal, and audio compression. For the record, I created this tutorial on a quad-core Mac Pro with two dual-core Intel Xeon Woodcrest processors running at 3.0GHz and 8GB RAM. Not that it matters, of course, because Soundbooth looks and feels identical on both platforms, but it’s hard not to feel a small thrill running Production Studio on a Mac for the first time.

Capturing High Quality Audio

When you're doing professional shoots, you've got two alternatives for capturing higher-quality audio: get really, really close to your subject, or get an external microphone. Assuming that close proximity is not always an option, with all the mics, connections, and strategies available, what do you need to know to do on-site sound right?

Fixing Your Audio

All of us have had audio rise up and bite us in the rear on a project or two, usually when we were focused elsewhere and not paying attention to levels, connections, and the like. Fortunately, with the right set of software tools and a bit of background information, you can eliminate many errors with little audible residue. The final product is never as good (or as fast) as it would be if you had gotten it right the first time, but all's well that ends well.

Audio Overview, Normalization, Pop & Cilck Removal and Noise Reduction

All of us have had audio rise up and bite us in the rear on a project or two, usually when we were focused elsewhere and not paying attention to levels, connections, and the like. Fortunately, with the right set of software tools and a bit of background information, you can eliminate many errors with little audible residue. The final product is never as good (or as fast) as it would be if you had gotten it right the first time, but all's well that ends well, especially when you have a DVD to deliver.