Choosing an encoder

Content in this category details the operation and quality of streaming video encoding tools.

A Buyer’s Guide to Cloud Encoders

There are many instances where cloud encoding is both efficient and cost-effective. For example, if you’re working with files already saved to the cloud -- perhaps for archival purposes, perhaps because you’re distributing content contributed by others -- you avoid the upload time that is the Achilles’ heel of video on demand (VOD) cloud encoding. In addition, if you experience a spike in encoding demand, say to re-encode a library of content for distribution to a new device, cloud encoding is also a great option.

First Look: Apple Compressor 4.1

Compressor 4.1 is the first major update to Compressor since well before Final Cut Pro X. I reviewed the software for Streaming Media Magazine, and found a great new interface, the same old plumbing and confusing operation; here's the pithy close: To...

Download Handout - Choosing an Enterprise Encoder

Here's the description; click over to the main article to download the handout.

This session will discuss factors to consider when choosing an enterprise video encoding system from the likes of ATEME, Envivio, MainConcept, Thomson, AmberFin, Elemental and others. Factors include performance, output quality, quality control options, format support, expansion options, programmability, and other variables.

Handout for Choosing a Live Encoder - SMWest 2012

Here's the seminar description:

Choosing a Live Streaming Encoder: This session discusses factors to consider when choosing a live streaming encoder, starting with free or inexpensive software options to high-volume, big iron systems, including quality, performance, portability, features, and format support. The session also examines how new cloud- based features such as live transrating are changing the requirements for on-location encoding. If you’re considering buying hardware or software for producing live events, you’ll find this session particularly useful.

Click to the article to download the handout.

Handout for Choosing an Enterprise Encoder

Here's the description. Click over to the article page to download the handout.

This session will discuss factors to consider when choosing an enterprise video encoding systems from the likes of Digital Rapids, Elemental, Harmonic, Sorenson, and Telestream. Factors incorporated into the analysis will include performance, output quality, quality control options, format support, expansion options, programmability, and other variables. If you're considering buying an enterprise encoder or upgrading your current systems, you'll find this session particularly useful.

Blackmagic H.264 Pro Recorder: High Quality, Frustrating Limits

Blackmagic Design's H.264 Pro Recorder ($499) performs a small set of functions reasonably well, including archiving footage to H.264 format at its native resolution and producing H.264 files for Apple TV, the iPad/iPhone 4, and uploading to YouTube at either 720p or 1080p. Even in these tasks, however, software limitations may limit overall utility, and if you're looking for a general-purpose hardware H.264 encoder for broader use, the H.264 Pro Recorder isn't it.

Buyer's Guide: Software Encoders

There are bundled, desktop, and enterprise offerings. Read on to learn which one is right for your needs.

Enough About HTML5 Video Already!

My latest column at Streaming Media Magazine. Here's the teaser: HTML5 video appeals to "tree-hugging, sandal-wearing standards lovers," says Jan Ozer, and he's sick of hearing about it. Here's the lead: I was speaking recently with a new consulting ...

Annual Choosing a Streaming Encoding Tool Story up on SMC

Every year I review streaming encoding programs for StreamingMedia.com. This year's issue is up, here's the lead. The ideal streaming encoding tool should provide great quality, blazing performance, a discrete set of critical encoding parameters, an...

Choosing a Streaming Encoding Tool

The ideal streaming encoding tool should provide great quality, blazing performance, a discrete set of critical encoding parameters, and a range of other time-saving automation and input/output options. We all know the names—Adobe Media Encoder, Compressor, Squeeze, Episode (in its many flavors), and Expression Encoder—so how do they stack up against this ideal? Glad you asked, because that’s what we’re going to explore.